Sep 19, 2011

The Dream Machine Chapters 1 & 2 review

Plato, Jung, Freud, a young ordinary couple and some exquisite visuals are the true stars of The Dream Machine; an episodic, indie point-and-click adventure game I have already enthusiastically previewed and now finally get to properly review. Well, properly review its first two chapters to be precise, as apparently the third and far from final one is just around the corner and not quite available yet. Besides, reviewing unreleased stuff can be quite tricky. Impossible some might say.

Now, following my urge to simply instruct you dear reader/minion-thing to immediately hop over to the Dream Machine site and grab it -for it is a great game indeed- would be way easier, but something tells me this wouldn't be much of a review then.

Anyway, let us now focus on the picture posted above. How could we describe it? Well, beautiful I suppose. Unique might come in handy too. And stylish. Yes, yes, deeply atmospheric also. Slightly ominous is another one. Definitely nice. Then again the word we are indeed looking for here is handcrafted. Yes, as in properly, physically, manually crafted using traditional non-digital components. Everything you'll see in the game -every backdrop, every character, every animation- was actually created by hand and photographed. This dear friend is 3D, but not of the 3D Studio kind:

Stunning visuals aside, the Dream Machine is an impressively good and rather traditional indie game of the point-and-click sort, that is less traditionally played via a browser and somehow manages to save your process in a cloud; or was that clouds? I frankly wouldn't know. Steam also sports some sort of a cloud they tell me, but I'm pretty sure I was once taught clouds are made of steam and, well, did I mention it's a great game? It is. And it's got a great and appropriate soundtrack to go with it too.

The puzzles, though relatively easy, are varied, excellently integrated in the plot and -importantly- never feel out of place or immersion-breaking. In the surreal and perfectly paced story of the game, after all, oddness feels integral. Besides, and without wanting to spoil anything from the plot which slowly progress from helping a likeable young couple find its way around a new apartment to discovering some rather disturbing truths, I really wouldn't care much for another vaguely disguised take on Tolkien and/or Stoker, let alone another half-baked adventure pathetically apeing genre classics. This actually is a truly original game that manages its characters, storytelling and twists way better than your average Hollywood movie.

Oh, and The Dream Machine is also one of those rare few game that constantly evoke the sense of wonder and excitement the games of yore used to. One simply can't expect the wonderfully wonderful wonders awaiting around the next corner and I can't help but feel this is what games were supposed to be all about. 

Verdict: A wonderful, smart, visually stunning, polished and downright brilliant adventure game. Buy it. Now.

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  1. The visuals are truly remarkable, lifelike even... verily magic at work here and an excellent review...

    (attempts to walk into room, bumps face on computer monitor...)

    ...yes well erm.. sorry bout that, lost myself in the moment....

  2. No worries. I have hired an excellently trained nose doctor. He'll have you bumping in screens in no time.

    Oh, and yes, it is lovely, isn't it?

  3. huh huh...:)

    (searches for some other means of entry into the lavish screenshots)